Jen Morris

Canonical in the history of materials, marble is a complex medium. It connotes complicated ideas of quality, value, and memorial and therefore somehow sanctions cultural memory. Marble contributes to a dialogue that is evermore common. It speaks to gaining jobs with industrialization, losing jobs with deindustrialization, globalization of a market, permanent structural changes to a landscape, and the use of a limited resource.

Post Office, Montpelier, Vermont
2016

Vermont Verde Marble is not actually marble. It is classified as a “serpentine” and is considered a semi precious stone. Serpentines are often used for carvings, jewelry, or as a decorative element in the design of interiors. The variety in this image is sourced only from a quarry in Rochester, Vermont.
Jen Morris Marble
The Vermont Room, Proctor Library, Proctor, Vermont
2016

The Vermont Marble Company was established in the late 1800s by Redfield Proctor. It grew to be one of the largest marble suppliers in the world, and at one point, it owned marble rights not only in Vermont, but also in Colorado, Alaska and Tennessee. In 1976 it was purchased by the Swiss Company Plüss-Staufer. The company was renamed OMYA, INC in 2000.
Jen Morris Marble
Tower, West Rutland
2016

A 2004 fire toppled a building from the 1920’s that once was a part of the Vermont Marble Company. Gawet Marble & Granite of Rutland Vermont had purchased the building in 1979. They had been using the building for small marble cutting shop, as well as the storage of trucks, fork lifts and other equipment.
Jen Morris Marble
Sutherland Quarry, Proctor, Vermont
2016

Sutherland Quarry opened in 1836 in Sutherland Falls Vermont. The quarry was eventually folded into Redfield Proctor’s Vermont Marble Company, and the unincorporated settlement of Sutherland Falls separated from Rutland and became the town of Proctor, Vermont.
Jen Morris Marble
Room and Pillar Mining, Danby, Vermont
2016

A process of underground removal that involves leaving pillars of the material to support a “roof”, while the rest is removed. The Danby Quarry is the largest underground marble quarry in the world.
Jen Morris Marble
Quarry Bay, Danby Quarry, Vermont
2016

Owned by OMYA, INC, the Danby Quarry is leased long-term to a European stone conglomerate headed by R.E.D. Graniti of Italy. R.E.D. Graniti quarries in locations all over the world, including Namibia, Brazil and Mexico.
Jen Morris Marble
Check-In Trailer, Danby Quarry, Vermont
2016

This trailer stands at the entrance to the Quarry, which reaches one and a half miles into Dorset Mountain. Approved visitors must sign in and obtain safety attire.
Jen Morris Marble
Cutting, Danby Quarry, Vermont
2016
Jen Morris Marble
Reinforcing, Danby Quarry, Vermont
2016

Marble is often reinforced to prevent breakage in shipping, and for aesthetic effect.
Jen Morris Marble
Finishing Area, Danby Quarry, Vermont
2016
Jen Morris Marble
Grave Stones, West Rutland, Vermont
2016
Jen Morris Marble
Interior Wall, The Carving Studio and Sculpture Center, West Rutland, Vermont
2016

Graffiti on the bricks inside a building at the The Carving Studio and Sculpture Center in West Rutland, Vermont. Some of the writings date back into the 1800s, and describe deaths and weather events.
Jen Morris Marble
Scrap, West Rutland, Vermont
2016
Jen Morris Marble
Closed Quarry, Marble Street, West Rutland, Vermont
2015
Jen Morris Marble
Quarry Office, Danby Quarry, Vermont
2016
Jen Morris Marble
Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, New Haven, Connecticut
2016

The marble panes of this library are one and one-quarter inch thick, and come from the Danby Quarry. These panes serve to filter light as it passes into the building, so as not to damage the rare books within.
Jen Morris Marble
Vermont State House, Montpelier, Vermont
2016

The floor of this government building is a checkerboard of white Danby Quarry marble and the grey-black limestone from the quarries of the Chazy Reef on Isle La Motte, an island in Lake Champlain.
Jen Morris Marble
Redfield Proctor, Proctor Free Library, Proctor, Vermont
2016

Redfield Proctor held many positions of prominence within the American government. As a US Senator, his influence insured that the Vermont Marble Company’s marble would be used in several national buildings and memorials, including the US Supreme Court and Arlington National Cemetery.
Jen Morris Marble
Display in the Vermont Room, Proctor Free Library, Proctor, Vermont
2016

The Proctor Free Library was built as a memorial to Arabella Proctor Holden, the daughter of Redfield Proctor and his wife, Mrs. Emily Dutton Proctor. Inside is an intergenerational collaboration of the people of Proctor known as “The Vermont Room.” Donations of all manner of ephemera, personal histories and valued objects have built a collection that speaks about the history of Proctor through a community effort of memory and memorial.
Jen Morris Marble
The Proctor Mausoleum, Proctor
2016

Redfield Proctor and his family rest here. The mausoleum, predictably, is made of marble.